<![CDATA[DayParentDad.com - Heart Land]]>Fri, 23 Jun 2017 11:53:26 -0600Weebly<![CDATA[Rosie Leaves The View | Heart Saving Not Heart Breaking]]>Wed, 11 Feb 2015 03:44:58 GMThttp://dayparentdad.com/8/post/2015/02/rosie-leaves-the-view-heart-saving-not-heart-breaking.html
Honestly, it must be hard being in the public eye all of the time. As a heart attack survivor, I can tell you that Rosie O'Donnell is absolutely right when she says minimizing stress is a key element to long term survival from heart disease and heart attack. I can only imagine that the time commitment alone doing a daily television show combined with a large family including teenagers must be beyond the stress tolerance of most people. Add to that the climate of a show that involves constant debate and argument in order to win ratings. Off the chart stressful. To Rosie, I say: Take care of yourself. You want to be around to meet those grand babies. Your choice to reduce stress, is exactly what we should be celebrating in our society. It's too bad the rest of our society doesn't understand that. It would save more lives. Best wishes to you and your family.
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<![CDATA[Go Red For Women | An Inspiring Minneapolis Lunch]]>Wed, 11 Feb 2015 02:23:32 GMThttp://dayparentdad.com/8/post/2015/02/go-red-for-women-an-inspiring-minneapolis-lunch.html
Men. Grab your red striped trousers, a pair of red suspenders, a red jacket and a tie with some red hearts. This is a serious lunch with a serious mission. Oh, and bring some cash, lots of cash.

I was a bit overwhelmed arriving at the Go Red For Women Lunch at the Minneapolis Hyatt this past month. Well appointed women in red were directing traffic everywhere. I got in the fifth line at the second table. I was then gently shoved to another line, checked in with quick accuracy, and sent on my way.

I entered the Hyatt ballroom. It was a sea of red. Women in red. Red curtains of red. Bags of red. Red ribbons. And a big television studio set on the dais with lighting, cameras and a very impressive tech crew. This was serious business.

I stumbled my way to the "Men Go Red" table - mostly guys with a few female friends. One speaker's husband was at the table. They were all very supportive. Most wearing red ties. I was not. I will not be clueless next time.

The program included inspiring speeches and a round table discussion in the living room set with professionals, and survivors. They educated the room on symptoms, procedures, diseases, outcomes, and most of all...they raised money. Lots of money. Over $600,000 for education and research to increase survival from heart disease for women.

So why would a man support this? Because my mother died from misdiagnosed heart disease. I inherited it and I want to make sure that if either of my daughters inherit it, they are protected and have the best chance of survival. Men don't just Go Red For Women. We go over the mountains and through the woods for their women. Red clothing is not optional. 

(Special thank you to Lisa Wipperman Heine who not only invited me to the lunch, but did a special tribute to my mother.)
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<![CDATA[My Mother Died From Heart Disease | Don't Let Yours]]>Wed, 20 Aug 2014 22:09:07 GMThttp://dayparentdad.com/8/post/2014/08/my-mother-died-from-heart-disease-dont-let-yours.html
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My dad and mom in happier days.
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NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
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By Russell W. Peterson | DayParentDad.com | 20 August 14

Today my mother would have turned 85. She was full of life. She loved having fun, helping others, spending time with friends and family, playing cards, toasting good times, and wearing her Ali Baba pants suits. We all thought she'd live past 100. Turns out, she didn't. She died 16 years ago after a short bout of what the doctors thought was the flu. Turns out, it wasn't.

It took me many months after her death to patch together what had happened. It is now clear that there is a genetic predisposition in her family to heart disease. Many cousins, siblings, uncles, aunts, grandparents and others have suffered with this affliction. Most likely it is caused by Familia Hyperlipidemia or genetic high cholesterol (Hypercholesterolemia) which in turn causes Atherosclerosis or hardening of the coronary arteries which in turn can lead to a heart attack. But it is stealthy and masks itself as other ailments.

We have been so programmed by television and the movies to believe in the Fred Sanford model with hand on heart yelling, "It's the BIG ONE." Well it usually isn't the big one, especially for women. In my mother's case, she had been diagnosed with allergies and asthma for a long time. She popped Sinutabs like they were candy just to get some relief. But nothing really helped. It is beyond sad that she and her doctors spent all that time treating a disease she didn't really have. The shortness of breath and breathing issues were really signs of heart disease. Please don't ignore that last sentence. THE SHORTNESS OF BREATH AND BREATHING ISSUES WERE REALLY SIGNS OF HEART DISEASE.

The Nation Institutes Of Health has a page on the symptoms of Heart Disease. Symptoms for women can be much different than those for men. Here is a list of potential symptoms from various sources:

POTENTIAL SYMPTOMS OF HEART DISEASE IN WOMEN
Some women who have coronary heart disease (CHD) have no symptoms at all. This is called silent CHD. Potential symptoms could include:
  • Angina: dull, heavy, or sharp pain or discomfort in the chest or heart area.
  • Pain in upper abdomen, back, throat, neck, or arms.
  • Fatigue.
  • Shortness of breath or other breathing difficulties such as allergies or asthma.
  • Swelling in legs, ankles, feet, and lower torso.
  • Fluttering feelings.
  • Indigestion, nausea, or vomiting.
  • Heartburn
  • High levels of blood pressure or bad cholesterol.

The Go Red For Women Campaign has a list of potential symptoms to watch for with heart attack in women. Here is a list I've compiled from multiple sources:

POTENTIAL SYMPTOMS OF A HEART ATTACK IN WOMEN
Although women can have chest pain during a heart attack, they are more than likely going to have one or more of the following symptoms:
  • Uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain in the center of your chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or goes away and comes back.
  • Pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw, shoulder or stomach.
  • Shortness of breath, with or without chest discomfort.
  • Breaking out in a cold sweat, dizziness or lightheadedness.
  • Right arm pain.
  • Nausea or vomiting similar to flu symptoms.
  • Sweating.
  • Unusual fatigue.
  • Unable to walk up stairs, push an object or lift something without losing breath.
  • Heartburn.

It is important to know that stress tests, EKG, and other blood tests may not confirm a heart disease diagnosis. Staying diligent and paying attention, especially if you have a family history or are a smoker or have been around second hand smoke, is vital. Although diet and exercise are important, I have found that diet alone is not enough in most cases to fight heart disease. You must be proactive on all fronts. The number one clinic in heart and vascular health is the Cleveland Clinic. The Mayo Clinic, the number one hospital in the nation, has a great summary for women. Please take a minute to go to these sites and become familiar with the information. Reach out to a doctor who is familiar with heart disease in women if you have concerns.

I imagine that if I had all this information two decades ago, my mother would be sitting across the table from me today. In her Ali Baba pants suit. Laughing and screaming 31. I miss that.
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<![CDATA[Intro To The Heart Land Blog | I Survived A Heart Attack]]>Wed, 06 Aug 2014 23:01:39 GMThttp://dayparentdad.com/8/post/2014/08/intro-to-the-heart-land-blog-i-survived-a-heart-attack.html
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Russell Peterson | DayParentDad.com
By Russell Peterson | DayParentDad.com | August 6, 2014

In Minnesota at the age of 49 I had a heart attack. I was laying in my bed at home in the early evening watching the new video release of my daughter dancing. Thinking I was having an asthma attack, I started to drive myself to urgent care. Thankfully, I had a neighbor who is smarter than me and she drove me herself. I'm doubly thankful the medical team recognized I was having a coronary event and sent me to the hospital. 

Many in my family have had such events, but I thought I had missed this demon and I would be the lucky one. Turns out, I probably am. I missed my girls dance show that weekend, but I survived a quadruple by pass and have been living relatively pain free for the past three years. I can do more than I was able before the heart attack and I have none of the asthmatic allergies I was diagnosed since childhood. Oops, apparently that misdiagnoses happens frequently. 

Currently, I am participating in a clinical research study at the Lillehei Center at the University of Minnesota for a new drug that has the potential to save millions of lives by reducing cholesterol production through genetics. Just a regular guy trying to do my part.

I decided to add this blog to my website after following a number of heart attack survivor pages in various social media settings. It is clear to me that these stories, relationships, procedures, and technological advances involving the survival of a heart attack need to be told. I'm not foolish enough to think my blog will save anybody, but I do hope it will enlighten and perhaps inspire.
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